Saint Adalbert Catholic Cemetery

Established 1872
6800 Milwaukee Ave
Niles, IL
60714
847-647-9845

SAINT ADALBERT is the largest Catholic Cemetery of the Archdiocese of Chicago, as measured in number of burials. It was established in 1872 to serve Polish Catholics of the north side.

The cemetery is named for the tenth century Saint Adalbert, the first Polish saint, known as the "Apostle of the Slavs" or "Apostle of Bohemia". A nobleman, bishop, and founder of a monastery, Adalbert was martyred on 23 April 997 while preaching to the Prussians.

Saint Adalbert Cemetery is located on Milwaukee Avenue in the town of Niles, a near north suburb of Chicago. It is clearly divided into two sections, east and west, by a quiet street. At the southeast corner of the western division is a small independent cemetery: Norwood Park Home Cemetery. Fences separate St. Adalbert from this central street, with opposing gates in the two adjoining sides permitting passage from one half to the other. Both halves of the cemetery contain old and new sections. New mausoleum construction takes place at the western edge of the western section.

This first of two installments of St. Adalbert on "Graveyards of Chicago" will show only the eastern half; the western half will be featured at a later date.

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SAINT ADALBERT: EASTERN DIVISION

Office Grotowski
Cross and Tomb Military Monument
Dyniewicz Column
Ledgers Bartik
Kozak Adamowski
The Good Shepherd Angel
Angel, Woman, Lyre Dressel
Holy Family Rev. Novacek
Kurtyka Waskiewicz
Typical Monuments Szymanski
Bialk The Little Fellow
Twin Angels Gothic Arch Monuments
Bozovsky Bozovsky Int.
Built-Up Christ the King
Covered Lot Ledger
Rough Cross Gothic and Ledger
Cermaka Nadolnego
George Halas (Chicago Bears Coach) Lyre Carrier
Sarcophagus Siuda
Beranek Krajewski
South Mausoleum Row Roubik Mausoleum
Richter Mausoleum Richter Angels
North Mausoleum Row

SAINT ADALBERT: WESTERN DIVISION

...coming soon

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© 2003 Matt Hucke
All content (text and photographs) by Matt Hucke, unless otherwise indicated.